Chocolate Cake with Burnt Oranges

Chocolate Cake with Burnt OrangesThis recipe is inspired by an old friend of my dad’s, Charlie, who used to visit us regularly for a weekend here and there when I was very small. While I’m not sure I could pick Charlie out of a line-up today if you put 6 elderly, white gentlemen in front of me with strong noses and spotted hands, my memories of time spent together are much clearer: Charlie quizzing me on my first grade vocabulary words and giving me a Tic-Tac for each one I managed to spell correctly. My father teasing him about his love for freshly grond black pepper noting that, “Charlie puts pepper on everything!” and me, my eyes wide, asking Charlie, “Even on apple pie?!” But most clearly, Charlie, coming through the door with an overnight bag in one hand and a paper bag in the other, filled with his wife, Charlene’s, chocolate cake with burnt oranges.

Chocolate Cake with Burnt OrangesCharlene’s cake was the perfect marriage of both their heritages – first generation Irish-Americans whose families lived on the same block in the Bronx growing up, making their courtship one that started in the 8th grade and lasted until they were both well into their 90s. While looking through old photographs on a visit home recently, I came across a photo from the ’70s of my young, stocky, mutton-chopped father sandwiched between Charlie and Charlene, a grocery bag at his feet with what I can only imagine is a chocolate cake with burnt oranges for him to carry home to my mother and me.

Chocolate Cake with Burnt OrangesChocolate cake with burnt oranges isn’t actually a “thing,” such as peanut butter and jelly or bagels and lox. In Ireland, burnt oranges are their own dessert, a sweet and bitter compote, spiked with whiskey, that caramelizes in the oven with butter and sugar and are then eaten, cooled, with cream or custard. Somewhere along the way, though, Charlene rather brilliantly decided to pair this golden-hued sauce with a dark chocolate cake and, well, she should be properly canonized for it. The oranges add the perfect bit of bitterness to offset the richness and sweetness from both the cake itself and the orange-caramel syrup produced by the oranges while roasting. Spooned over an already moist cake, the oranges and their amber juices turn the cake’s texture into one, almost, like a steamed pudding – soft and treacly.

Chocolate Cake with Burnt OrangesSadly, Charlene’s exact recipe is lost to history, as both she and Charlie passed on long ago, well beyond I became consciously interested in cooking and baking. I remember it enough to think, though, that this recipe is fairly close and, if my memory does fail me at all, well, this is awfully good too. What this recipe lacks in visual appeal (in addition to this weird set of half-cropped photos I’ve, somehow, managed here!), it makes up for in flavor – of which it has a lot! Share this with your favorite chocolate-orange lover or after your St. Patrick’s day dinner. With a swirl of whipped cream and a cup of tea or, better yet, an Irish coffee, this cake is sure to leave you returning for seconds.

Chocolate Cake with Burnt Oranges
Cake is Ina Garten’s recipe. Oranges adapted from here & here.

Ingredients
For the cake
Butter, for greasing the pans
1 3/4 cups all-purpose flour, plus more for pans
2 cups sugar
3/4 cups good cocoa powder
2 teaspoons baking soda
1 teaspoon baking powder
1 teaspoon kosher salt
1 cup buttermilk, shaken
1/2 cup vegetable oil
2 extra-large eggs, at room temperature
1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
1 cup freshly brewed hot coffee
Powdered sugar for garnish

For the burnt oranges
3 large navel oranges, scrubbed clean
7 tablespoons of butter, softened and separated
3-1/2 cups of granulated sugar
Pinch of salt
1-1/2 tablespoons of Irish whiskey (brandy may also be substituted)
1/2 cup of orange juice, fresh-squeezed or bottled
1/8 teaspoon of vanilla extract

Directions
For the cake
Preheat the oven to 350° F. Butter and flour one 10″ bundt pan and set aside.

Sift the flour, sugar, cocoa, baking soda, baking powder, and salt into a mixing bowl and blend by hand or on low speed until combined. In another bowl, combine the buttermilk, oil, eggs, and vanilla. With a hand blender on low speed, slowly add the wet ingredients to the dry. With mixer still on low, add the coffee and stir just to combine, scraping the bottom of the bowl with a rubber spatula. The batter will be very, very loose after the coffee – don’t fret! Pour the batter into the prepared pan and bake for 35 to 40 minutes, until a cake tester comes out clean. Cool in the pan for 30 minutes, then turn it out onto a cooling rack and cool completely. Once cool, dust with powdered sugar.

For the burnt oranges
Preheat your oven to 450° F. Pour 1/2 cup of sugar onto a large plate. Next, smear the oranges with 6 tablespoons of the softened butter and roll them in the sugar, being sure to cover them as fully as possible. Pour the remaining 3 cups of sugar and whatever sugar remains on the plate into the bottom of an 8″ square cake pan and shake it gently to evenly distribute it over the bottom. Place the butter and sugar coated oranges into the pan and bake for 20 minutes; you may need to give the pan a little swirl halfway through to break up any unmelted sugar. After 20 minutes, remove the pan from the oven and transfer the oranges to a stable work surface where they can cool for 15 minutes. Do not turn your oven off, but do turn it down to 425° F. After the oranges have cooled enough where you can touch them, carefully cut each of them into quarters and place them skin side up back into the pan. Bake for another 15 minutes, or until the skins have browned.

Remove the oranges from the oven once more, but leave it on. Put oranges back on your work surface and in the hot pan, immediately add a tiny pinch of salt, the whiskey, and the orange juice. Return to oven for 10 minutes or until the liquid has become a bit thicker and is bubbling. In the meantime, remove the pulp from the oranges carefully avoiding any of the white pith, which will make your mixture very bitter. You only want to remove the flesh. After the liquid has thickened, remove from the oven (you can finally shut your oven off now), and add the vanilla and remaining tablespoon of butter. Stir in the orange pieces. Serve warm over slices of cake and add a dollop of homemade whipped cream.

Dried Orange Slices for Tea

Dried Orange Slices for TeaSometimes life is kind enough to bring a friend into your life at just the right time, in just the right place, and you have it and hold it dear to you for all the rest of your days. For me, that’s my friend Emily. Em came into my life my first year of graduate school when I had just moved to Minnesota knowing only one person in the entire state, as I was about to start a seven year program as a cohort of one. The first year of my Ph.D. program was a humbling experience altogether, but those first weeks were brutal. I sat in my classes stunned into silence by my peers and by students three and four years in with so much more knowledge and poise than I thought would ever be possible for me to attain. The community in my department was welcoming, certainly, but not having anyone with whom to share the vulnerabilities and doubts of the first few weeks was scary and isolating.

Emily was part of a cohort of first years in a neighboring department where we met in a class on gender, race, and class in American culture. They were all so nice and warm and I was lucky that they brought me into their fold as an honorary member as quickly and effortlessly as they did. I hate to think what the rest of that year would have looked like for me had they not taken me in. I got even luckier, though, when Emily and I discovered that we lived literally right on the other side of the block from one another – oh, kismet! Our friendship was sealed and we’ve shared many a memory and milestone together since.

Dried Orange Slices for TeaThough Em has long since moved back to San Francisco, I still miss her like she left yesterday. Which is why when I recently found myself with a brand-new mandolin slicer, my first thought of making a grilled zucchini lasagna was eclipsed by the idea of making some dried orange slices for tea and sending them her way. Emily is a tea connoisseur, you see. Prior to meeting her, I always just happily drank whatever bags I had gotten on sale last time I went to the grocery. I knew nothing beyond those sad, little pouches. Loose tea? Different brew times? Herbal vs. black? No clue.

What I learned through my friendship with Emily, though, and the inspiration I found as I tasted and learned about different teas through her and for myself, was that great teas are uncomplicated, sometimes not very fancy at all, and are best when left alone or, only slightly adulterated, by the tiniest squeeze of lemon or drop of cream. These very thinly sliced, dehydrated oranges and lemons – one snuck in to my slicing and drying! – are a wonderful addition to any old cup of tea. They add a subtle sweet taste of citrus to your brew and the aroma of them steeping in the hot water makes every sip feel really special.

Dried Orange Slices for TeaKept in a sealed container – I’m partial to a small jelly jar, but even a sealable plastic bag will do – they last forever. While they’re obviously great in hot tea, I’ve also enjoyed them in iced tea, cold water, and Em herself gave me the great idea to try one in a pint of wheat beer. So refreshing! These are a year-round staple, a great gift, and a sweet new way to enjoy a bunch of different beverages. I’m imagining them in a bevy of different summer cocktails as well!

Or, if you’re Bear, you can also dip them halfway in melted dark chocolate, let them set up on some waxed paper in the fridge, and then talk about how you’re a master chocolatier and have never tasted anything better in your life. Whatever your pick. You do you.

Dried Orange Slices
1 orange yields approximately 10 slices; recipe may also be used for lemons and limes

Ingredients
1 orange
1/2 teaspoon of sugar (optional)

Directions
Preheat oven to 200°F. Line a baking sheet with a silicon baking mat or parchment paper and set aside. Using a mandolin or a very sharp knife, carefully slice the orange – my mandolin was set on its thinnest setting, which is 1/16th of an inch. Arrange orange slices on the baking sheet in a single layer and sprinkle with sugar if desired – I skipped the sugar because my oranges were very, very sweet. Bake for 2 to 2-1/2 hours or until the slices are completely dry and the flesh is translucent. Remove carefully to a baking rack and allow to cool completely before storing.