Mushroom and Kale Egg Bake

Mushroom and Kale Egg BakeAdulting is hard stuff. Sure, there are the big things like taking care of kids or parents, unexpected car and home repairs, dealing with awful work situations, but sometimes the littlest things feel the most difficult. These days, one of my biggest dilemmas is finding what to feed myself in the mornings that is convenient, nourishing, and so tasty I’ll be psyched to eat it a few days a week. This mushroom and kale egg bake hits all the marks!

Mushroom and Kale Egg BakeI’ll be the first to say that when it comes to breakfast, I’m picky. It’s not that I don’t like all the very many breakfast options available to me, but on weekdays, I almost always want something fast and something that isn’t sweet. I’m up so early Monday through Friday that I can’t stomach much breakfast at all let alone something sugary or even fruity. This winds up eliminating a lot of standard, and quick go-to breakfast items, like smoothies, oatmeal, and yogurt. These are all delicious things, but none that really fit what I’m looking for in breakfast these days.

Mushroom and Kale Egg BakeA lot of strategizing has caused me to embrace the egg bake as the solution to my problems. Sure, I don’t want to eat eggs five days a week, but with this make ahead, it’s easy to grab it for a few days and pepper the rest of the week with other options. While you can customize an egg bake with anything you’re craving, this mushroom and kale combination is my new and current favorite.

Mushroom and Kale Egg BakeWith only a handful of ingredients and a fairly quick preparation, this is the perfect thing to bake off on a Sunday and then feed yourself with it throughout the week, microwaving it for just a minute or so to warm it through when you want to enjoy it. I’ve frozen pieces I haven’t gotten to in a week and after a quick thaw, they’re good as new warmed up for next week or next month. I’m hooked!

Mushroom and Kale Egg BakeThe inspiration for this combination comes from a delicious mushroom toast recipe that my mom and I have been making for years around the holidays and that I think of several times a month even when it’s not anywhere near Christmastime, that’s how good it is. Garlicky kale seemed like it would be a good partner in this egg bake marriage with the buttery mushroom mixture and, well, it’s truly kismet.

Mushroom and Kale Egg BakeLots of delicious, earthy flavors in this mushroom and kale egg bake, but truly, you can use the base of this recipe to make it your own. Use it to power you through your work week mornings or even as a light lunch. While I cut this into 4-6 wedges and take them  for breakfast, this also makes a great main dish at a brunch or as a contribution to a potluck – Easter brunch recipe, maybe? What will you put in your egg bake this week?

Mushroom and Kale Egg Bake
Yields approximately 6 servings

Ingredients
1 tablespoon of butter
2-3 tablespoons of olive oil, divided
1 shallot, minced
8oz of white button mushrooms, cleaned
1/2 teaspoon of herbs de provence or dried thyme
Salt & pepper
1 teaspoon of fresh lemon juice
2 tablespoons of half & half or heavy cream
1/2 cup parmesan cheese, divided
2 cups of kale, stemmed and cleaned
1 clove of garlic minced
6 eggs
1/4 cup of milk

Directions
In a large skillet, add one tablespoon of olive oil and one tablespoon of butter over medium heat. While it is melting, mince the shallot and add to pan sautéing and stirring occasionally. You’ll want to cook the shallots about 3 minutes. While the shallot is cooking, chop the mushrooms and then add to the skillet with some salt and pepper and the herbs de provence. You may need to add another teaspoon or two of olive oil to the mushrooms as they cook if they become dry. Cook mushrooms with shallots for about 5 minutes or until the mushrooms have browned nicely. Lower the heat to medium-low and add the lemon juice, cream, and half of the parmesan cheese and stir to combine. Cook for 3-4 minutes until all of the ingredients are incorporated and then remove from pan and set aside in a bowl.

Cut your clean, stemmed kale into 1/2-inch ribbons and then mince the garlic clove. Wipe out the skillet you used to cook the mushrooms and add a tablespoon of olive oil over medium-high heat. Add the garlic clove and sauté for a minute or two until fragrant and slightly softened. Add the kale and toss in the oil and garlic with a little bit of salt and pepper for one minute or until wilted, but not completely soft. Remove from heat, add the mushroom mixture and combine thoroughly. Allow to cool while you prepare the eggs.

Preheat your oven to 350°F. In a medium-sized bowl combine the eggs, milk, remaining parmesan cheese, salt, and lots of fresh black pepper. Prepare a 9″ round baking dish (mine is 9″ across and 3″ deep) with cooking spray or some softened butter on the bottom and around the sides. Pour the egg mixture into the baking pan and then top with heaping spoonfuls of the mushroom mixture. Use a butter knife to gently swirl the mushroom filling into the eggs and then put in the oven. Bake for 30 minutes or until the middle is just set and the slightly brown edges have pulled away from the sides of the baking vessel. Allow to cool slightly and then slice into wedges for serving. Can be eaten hot or at room temperature.

Bacon Dijon Deviled Eggs

Well, readers, here we are: one day past the week where few could escape the notion, or practice, of hard boiling and dyeing eggs, and one week further into spring where, at least in the Northeast, the days have finally been warming up a little bit. On Saturday, I walked around without my coat on for a solid 30 minutes until the sun ducked behind a cloud and I, miserably, trudged back to the car to get it before resuming the mini antiquing jaunt I took with my mom to a neighboring town. Lion, lamb, I know.

This is all to say that ’tis the season for doing something with hard boiled eggs, which, when I’m faced with, always results in deviled eggs. I resisted deviled eggs until I was about 20, even though my own mother was rumored by family and friends alike to make absolutely delicious ones. When I finally gave in, I realized several things: 1) Everyone loves deviled eggs and I was totally missing out and 2) You can mix almost anything into a standard deviled egg recipe and it only makes them more delicious. So many variations can be born, which brings me to my favorite point about deviled eggs: depending on context even more than ingredients, they can be considered fancy fare or not!

Take these bacon dijon deviled eggs (that even Ollie would, apparently, be interested in eating. Cat bomb!). On that plate up there, with their little pickled onion garnish (I have a whole beautiful quart of these to use, y’all), they look pretty enough for a tea party or some sort of shower. But put them on a table next to some ribs and corn and it’s summer in the backyard being sweaty and lazy with your pals.

Deviled eggs never disappoint and this version is no exception. Who doesn’t want a little smoky, crispy bacon stirred into their eggs alongside the gentle bite of dijon mustard? That sounds like the start of a perfect egg sandwich! I know not everyone will be inspired to go so far as making the pickled onions, but let me just argue for the extra step by simply saying that their addition to these deviled eggs is kismet. The little burst of pickling liquid and onion juice, which so nicely cuts through the richness of egg yolk, mayo, and bacon, is a pairing that shouldn’t be missed. If you do forego the pickled onions, these deviled eggs certainly will not disappoint on their own; though you could always add a little slice or mince of dill pickle to the tops, which would do the job, too.


Bacon Dijon Deviled Eggs with Pickled Onions
Yields 24 halves

Ingredients:
1 dozen eggs
1/3 cup of mayonnaise
2 Tablespoons of dijon mustard
4-6 pieces of thick sliced bacon, cooked crispy and crumbled
1 Tablespoon of minced onion or dehydrated onion flakes
1/8 teaspoon of smoked paprika
Salt & pepper to taste
Pickled onions to garnish, optional

Directions:
Several hours before serving, or better yet, the night before, hard boil the eggs. Using eggs purchased at least a week in advance will help with the peeling process later, as older eggs shed their shell much easier.

Put all 12 eggs in a heavy-bottom pot and cover with cold water by at least an inch. Add a pinch of salt to the water and bring to a boil. Once the eggs begin boiling, cover with lid, remove from heat, and allow to stand for 15 minutes. Drain hot water and fill the pot with cold water until the eggs can be handled. After several minutes remove them from the pot (which will eventually turn the water warm again due to residual heat – you don’t want this to happen!) and gently crack the shells a bit all over. Transfer the eggs to a big bowl of cold water and allow to sit until completely cooled. Pre-cracking the shells here will allow them to loosen as they finish cooling in the second bowl of water.

When the eggs are cooled, crack further and peel. I find peeling them under running water in the sink helps remove the shells easily, too. When finished, slice each egg in half lengthwise, putting the yolks in a clean, dry bowl and lay the whites on the plate you plan to serve them on. In the bowl with the yolks, use a fork to crumble all of the egg yolks. Add a small trickle of water, about a teaspoon, to the yolks to help them cream together a bit before adding the remaining ingredients. Add minced onion, salt and pepper, mayonnaise, dijon mustard, and smoked paprika. Blend until fairly smooth. Fold in the chopped bacon and fill the egg white halves. When finished, garnish each with a slice of pickled onion.

Decorate Your Easter Eggs with Sharpies

I feel like I should start this post off by stating, for the record, that I don’t have a pre-existing relationship with the company that makes Sharpies. It’s merely coincidence that two of my craft tutorials so far on here involve them. What can I say? I’ve never met an office supply store or a back-to-school sale I didn’t like. One of my favorite places to lose time on campus at my Big 10 graduate school was in the three aisles of the bookstore that were dedicated to writing implements. Pens in every shade of ink, mechanical pencils, highlighters, and so many varieties of Sharpies. A girl could lose herself and her meager graduate student earnings in there!

My love affair with brightly colored gel pens and markers has not, it seems, gone unnoticed by my family, either. One of my Christmas presents this year was a pack of 80s-glam-inspired Sharpies. But even for an enthusiast like myself, I didn’t know what, when, or how I’d use 24 of them. Turns out, that problem is easy to solve, as they’ve already decorated fancy cards & envelopes, coffee mugs for some besties, and even upgraded my mani by standing in for those awful nail art pens — thanks for the tip, Beauty Department!

Spying them in my craft bin again last week, I wondered what kind of seasonal project I could use them in and the colorful, intricate designs of pysanka, or Ukrainian Easter eggs, came to mind. Have you ever made pysanka? They are not for the weary! They take hours; drawing in the lines and shapes with melted beeswax, dyeing them layer after layer, and then finally melting and rubbing off the final coating of wax. It can take up a whole day just making one! So, needless to say, trying to re-create the detail of these ornate beauties wound up being more labor-intensive than I had planned, even without the wax and the dye! Thus, my Sharpie Easter eggs (or springtime eggs if you’re more inclined) eventually went in a different direction to capture the whimsy of the coming season.

The cold, bleary Midwest has me dreaming of the firsts of spring – robins, flower buds, and that glorious day of the year when the ground is finally released from the grip of winter and the sweet, soddy smell of dirt and vegetation fill the air. Just the thought of it has me feeling positively poetic! Plus, I’ve had this adorable fake robin (of which Bear is all “OMG, I’m in love with a girl who hoards fake, stuffed birds and saves them for a rainy day?!”) in my possession for far too long without it seeing the light of day. Of course I had to heed the advice of Portlandia and put a bird on it! Also, what better way to market yourself? Who needs business cards or search engine optimization? I’ve got self-designed, hand-drawn eggs, y’all!

I used hard-boiled eggs for this project and the ink never reaches the flesh of the egg itself, keeping them perfectly edible. You could, of course, always empty them first and then decorate them if you continue to have concerns or just don’t like eggs in their hard-boiled form. I might make some more for my Easter table with the requisite bunnies, chicks, and resurrection – kidding on the last one! – but am also wanting to do a small set mimicking different cross-stitch patterns. Basically, I see a lot of egg salad in my future.

Sharpie-Designed Easter/Springtime Eggs
Supplies:
Eggs – quantity determined by you
Cold water
Heavy-bottomed pot w/lid that will accomodate your eggs in a single layer and hold enough water to cover them by at least an inch
Permanent markers – I used these
Ingredients for this, optional

Directions:
Place your eggs in the bottom of a heavy-bottomed pot in a single layer. Fill with cold water, stopping when the eggs are covered by an inch or two. With the lid off, heat the eggs to a full boil, then cover the pot and remove it from the heat. Allow the eggs to sit undisturbed for 17 minutes. Next, drain the eggs and plunge them into a bowl of cold water. Allow the eggs to cool completely. At this point, you can dry them off and prepare them for decorating or refrigerate them until you’re ready for them. Either way, before decorating with the markers, the eggs must be allowed to warm up just enough to take the cold from the fridge off the outer shell, otherwise they will develop condensation from the heat of your hands making the markers run and skip. When decorating, keep some paper towels nearby just in case, dabbing off the moisture as needed. As you go along, it will become clear how the marker’s flow allows you to draw precise lines, follow the curve of the egg, and apply the ink gently, blending it with your finger, to create shading. When finished, immediately return your eggs to the refrigerator. Eat within one week.

Sunday Morning Breakfast Pie

In my world, Sundays are the best days. Even though there is the inevitable moment or two, as the day winds down, where you feel the disappointment of an ending weekend, Sundays provide ample time for slowness and care. I hate leaving the house on Sunday. Saturday brunch? Fantastic. Sunday? No, thanks. I have something low and slow I want to get in the oven for a late afternoon meal. I want to spend the day catching up with my mom on the phone, watch a movie on the couch under blankets, work on a project that gives me some happiness. Sundays are pleasurable, are down time, family time, home time. Sundays make me want to strip and freshen the bed, change the tablecloth, only so I can cozy up to them both later for early bedtime reading or dessert.

When all works in my favor and I’m aimed to have a Sunday like this one described, I want something for breakfast that is delicious, that feels decadent, that takes some time, but doesn’t have me in the kitchen for 2 hours. Give me homemade biscuits and tomato gravy. French toast. Breakfast Pie.

The latter has all the tenets of a perfect Sunday morning dish. It’s comforting, it’s satisfying, and it’s completely customizable to your tastes and pantry. Which, when really taking things slow and enjoying the simple pleasures of Sunday, allow you to appeal to your deepest gustatory desires. If you have a sense of what things you might like in quiche or frittata, those same things work here. In essence, you’re creating a kind of breakfast pizza sans sauce (though no one is saying you couldn’t make hollandaise!). While I happened to have a Trader Joe’s pizza crust on hand, forming the base for this, I’ve used this 30-minute dough recipe before and it’s both tasty and easy. While it’s resting, you can prep the rest of your ingredients, keeping time on your side.

Today’s breakfast pie had to do with clearing out some leftovers in the fridge – 2 handfuls of cooked, cold hashbrowns, a small piece of purple onion, some cooked bacon hanging out in the cheese bin from earlier in the week – while having something toasty and cheesy on my plate by the time a load of laundry was done. This is a great recipe for getting creative, for making substitutions that – within reason – work, only taking you in a different direction, not throwing off the whole dish. It can be really down-home or made fancier with something like fresh dill and smoked salmon. It’s great right after it’s set out of the oven or at room temperature, making it perfect for a brunch buffet or potluck, too. Depending on what else is on the table, it can easily serve a small crowd.

Sunday Morning Breakfast Pie
6-8 servings

Ingredients:
1 pizza dough, room temperature (I used Trader Joe’s dough. Homemade is great, but dough in the refrigerated tube works too!)
5 eggs
1/4 cup of milk or cream
Salt & Pepper
1-cup of pre-cooked hashbrowns (or any kind of pre-cooked potatoes)
6 slices of pre-cooked bacon, chopped
1-1/2 cups of shredded mozzarella cheese
3 Tablespoons of diced red onion
4oz. of cream cheese cut into 1/2-inch cubes

Directions:
Preheat the oven to 350°. Grease a quarter sheet pan with a 1-inch edge and roll your room temperature dough into the corners and up the sides of the pan. If the dough is cold, it will shrink down and not allow you to completely spread it to the size of the pan, so make sure it is room temperature. Cover the bottom of the dough with a cup of the mozzarella. When melted, this will provide enough barrier from the wetness of the egg mixture to keep your bottom crust crusty and brown as opposed to mushy. Next sprinkle the potatoes over the cheese and follow with the chopped bacon, evenly distributing the ingredients. In a bowl, whisk the eggs and the milk with salt and pepper and pour the mixture over bottom of the dough slowly, making sure it gets into the corners and between the pieces of potato and bacon. You should have an even, eggy layer spotted with bacon and potatoes. Next, sprinkle the diced red onion over the top and scatter the cubes of cream cheese over the egg mixture as well, making sure they are halfway submerged. Sprinkle the top of the pie with the remaining mozzarella cheese and bake for 30 minutes. After the half hour has elapsed, check the dish. If the crust is brown, but the egg is not entirely set in the center, put your broiler on low and allow to cook an additional 5 minutes, or as needed, checking regularly. When finished baking, allow to cool slightly and set up for approximately 5-7 minutes. Cut into wedges or squares and serve. I like mine dotted with hot sauce.